Sustainability Targets

To view our targets for the region, click on a circle in the image below. You will then see a synopsis of each point. To learn more about that particular point, click the "read more" link at the bottom of the point's synopsis popup window.

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By 2020, all new residential and commercial buildings will be built using sustainable design practices equivalent to LEED Silver Standards

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By 2020, reduce regional greenhouse gas emissions by 20% below 2005 levels. By 2050, reduce emissions by 80% below 2005 levelss

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Beginning in 2014, the region’s air quality will be improving and ambient concentrations will be reduced below federal standards

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The region will identify, conserve and enhance a network of protected open spaces, parks, and green infrastructure to provide ecological benefits, wildlife habitat, recreational opportunities, and scenic beauty

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By 2050, 50% of all sentinel watersheds will be in good or excellent condition

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By 2025, achieve 100% of Chesapeake Bay Program’s Water Quality Implementation Goals

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Beginning in 2012, the region will maintain more than 450,000 acres of agriculture land in farms


Retaining our place as a world capital requires metropolitan Washington to use energy and its natural resources wisely. By mid-century, area residents will benefit from green building practices, use agricultural resources efficiently, and conserve energy. The region will be one the nation’s most desirable places to live because it will be a leader in sustainability.

The growing interest in controlling greenhouse gas emissions will lead to new ways to power motor vehicles and even car-sharing programs to limit their use. New housing and commercial developments will adopt technological advances to market themselves as environmentally friendly and carbon neutral. Innovative new solar technology programs will flourish, allowing single households or buildings to generate most of their own energy needs.

Many households will use a smart grid technology and earn money by selling power back to the local grid when it is needed most. Improved municipal recycling and composting efforts will be so popular households generate little to no waste. The regional heat island effect has been mitigated due to a reduction in impervious surfaces, green rooftops, and mature trees planted on every street.

Local food grown on agricultural lands and even urban rooftops will supply fresh produce to a larger number of the region’s households as well as farmers’ markets located at the center of a community. The region’s water and air quality will be so healthy they will help attract more families to the region. The Chesapeake Bay’s ecosystem will show signs of improvement due to limiting suburban sprawl and aggressive land preservation efforts.